Rethink stress, live longer!

 How many of you have been experiencing heavy loads of stress? Even if you’ve experienced moderate stress, how bogged down and irritated are you that you’ve had to endure all that horrid stress? Many of us believe that stress is inherently bad, and something to be reduced to the absolute minimum, but rethinking stress could be a life saver.

We have all heard of strategies to reduce stress, go for a walk or get some kind of exercise, take a moment to breathe, talk to someone; which are all great pieces of advice. These strategies attempt to deal with stress, but even better is to reappraise stress entirely. That means rethink stress, not as a useless burden, but as a positive function. From now on believe that stress is a healthy service that your body provides to help you achieve and perform your very best.

It’s true that prolonged stressful experiences can lead to negative health outcomes, but if we perceive stress as harmless, or better yet a positive motivator, we can protect ourselves from an increased risk of premature death. In a study of 28,753 US residents who completed a survey asking about their experiences of stress, perceptions of stress, and if they sought help for their stress, the following data was gathered:

After a 9 year follow up a total of 2,960 (10.3%) of the original participants had died. Taking into account experiencing moderate to heavy amounts of stress and a belief that stress impacts health resulted in an increased risk of premature death by 43%! The authors admit that this study cannot establish a causal link between stress perceptions and early death, but intuitively we can all imagine the torturous grind of believing stress is negatively affecting you combined with heavy to moderate life stress. Believing something like stress is bad for you – and heavily engaging in it – is, in fact, terrible for you.

Are you at all surprised about how many people experienced moderate to heavy amounts of stress? Where do you find yourself on this questionnaire, especially when it comes to your perception of stress? I personally find it striking that many people don’t choose to take action to control stress. We can do that for ourselves now by remembering the push our body gives in response to a stressful situation is there to lift us up, not hold us down. The next time you feel that strong pulse and increased consumption of energy, know that that is your body saying “challenge accepted”.

Scientific Literature:

Keller, A., Litzelman, K., Wisk, L. E., Maddox, T., Cheng, E. R., Creswell, P. D., & Witt, W. P. (2012). Does the perception that stress affects health matter? The association with health and mortality. Health Psychology, 31(5), 677.

 

© Rebecca Böhme & Andrew Wold, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to the authors with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Photo by Emma Simpson on Unsplash

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